Oct 30 2017

The artificial resurrection: Genesis and genetics in Blade Runner 2049

Blade Runner 2049-Sea Wall-M

In this sequel, moral absolutes have succumbed to corporate interests and brutal pragmatism. The film poses uncomfortable questions for a culture whose prosperity is maintained artificially and unsustainably through abortion, exploitation and war, and whose divorce of sex from procreation is slowly but surely drifting into a demographic winter.

Continue reading

Share Button

Jun 17 2017

Nephilim, Anakim, and Why Andrew Wilson is Wrong

GrapesofEshcol-stained glass-CanterburyCathedral

Why do serious theologians persist with a story that reads like third-rate fan fiction?

Continue reading

Share Button

Apr 13 2017

Levi the Preacher-Swordsman – Part 1

viking-sword-monument

“Although the Bible has no corporeal legendary swords, it does have a kind of legendary swordsman.”

Continue reading

Share Button

Jan 25 2017

Crafty Lot

Sodom fire art

Lot offering his daughters to the men of Sodom is an affront to our moral sensibilities, yet the New Testament calls him a righteous man. Could our problem be simply that the Bible is smarter than we are?

Continue reading

Share Button

Aug 26 2016

Brexit and the Binding of Satan – Part 3

Roman iron mask

The feet of the great statue in Nebuchadnezzar’s dream cannot be interpreted as a prediction of the states of modern Europe, but the lessons from their failure can certainly be applied.

Continue reading

Share Button

Nov 2 2015

Little Book of Horrors

Audreys

Hollywood has a history of swapping tragic endings for happy ones based on the reaction of test audiences. Perhaps the most spectacular example is the 1986 movie adaptation of Little Shop of Horrors, whose original sinister ending was so disturbing that it remained unseen for decades and became the stuff of legend. Yet this musical really does require two endings, the comic and the tragic, because its conniving, carnivorous plant has biblical roots.

Continue reading

Share Button

Jul 7 2015

Cultivation and Representation

TheAmbassadors-Holbein

“In the days when our courts are declaring that good is evil and evil is good, the recovery of baptism as a delegation of divine legal authority rather than a sign of ‘limited Covenantal obligation’ is crucial.”

Every biblical Covenant is a word from heaven designed to bring a response from the earth. When the laws in the Ark of the testimony were given to Israel, the response of a legal oath was required, intended to culminate in the legal witness of Israel to the nations. Thus, every biblical Covenant is also a process which leads to maturity, beginning with cultivation and ending in representation.

A child must be schooled before he can be employed. A man must be a disciple before he can be an apostle. Adam was to be qualified before he could represent God as a just and merciful judge on earth. But the difference between cultivation and representation is the difference between circumcision and baptism, and this facet of the biblical Covenants is something paedobaptists are unable to accept, at least in its full glory.

Continue reading

Share Button

Apr 14 2015

Justified in His Sight

adam-and-eve-overdressed

Is our justification a past event or a future one? The debate continues while the answer is, like Adam and Eve, hidden in plain sight.

The problem with most theological discussions concerning our justification is that they are imagined in the courts of men rather than in the court of God. What is the difference between these two courts?

Continue reading

Share Button

Apr 6 2015

The First Ascension

sacrificeofnoah

The analogy between human beings and animals, seen throughout the Bible, means that in the animal world there are some who represent the whole.

Continue reading

Share Button

Apr 5 2015

Judge Not

Cabanet-AngelStudy

How will the world judge God
when given the opportunity?

For God does know that in the day you eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and you shall be as gods, knowing good and evil. (Genesis 3:5)

You shall have no other gods before me. (Exodus 20:3)

Jesus answered them, “Is it not written in your Law, ‘I said, you are gods’?” (John 10:34)

The aim of the testing of Adam was to qualify him to be a co-regent with God. Rich Bledsoe argues that the question of God’s existence is not ontological but ethical at heart. History is Man’s attempt to either eradicate God’s rule, or to make God co-regent with Man.
Continue reading

Share Button